‘Millionaires’ say they are going back to their ancestral lands to protect ‘a sacred area’

A group of wealthy and well-connected Indians are taking a stand against the encroachment of encroaching cattle on their ancestral land, as well as their livelihoods.

The “millionaires” of the region, who claim they own an area of 8,000 sq km (4,000 square miles) in the state of Uttar Pradesh, have called for the government to take immediate action against the cattle.

The land is located between the hills of Amethi and the city of Lucknow.

The owners are also trying to stop the encroaching of cattle in their ancestral domain.

The area of Amithi is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with an area roughly the size of Belgium.

The hill of Glidden, on the other hand, is a major tourist destination and the region has been hit hard by the encroaches of cattle, with the government of Uttar Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh’s state animal welfare department all claiming the area is being encroached upon by cattle.

“The area of Glendale is being attacked by cattle and the area of my ancestral domain has been taken over by cattle,” said Prakash Gopal, a well-known businessman, who lives in Glidden.

Gopal said the cattle encroachment is a threat to the livelihood of the villagers who work in the hill of Amathi and nearby villages.

“Cattle can take their own lives.

But what is important is that we keep our lands protected.

The people who own these lands have been asking for a law for years, but no law has been passed,” Gopal told Al Jazeera.

“We want a law to stop cattle encroaching in these areas.

The “tribe elders” are part of a group of well-educated and wealthy people who have decided to protect the land from encroachment by cattle in order to ensure their survival, said Gopal. “

If you take away the cows from these areas, we are going to go there.”

The “tribe elders” are part of a group of well-educated and wealthy people who have decided to protect the land from encroachment by cattle in order to ensure their survival, said Gopal.

“People in the village say, ‘We are not going to move to the hills because we have been living here for generations.

But if you move away, we will die’.

So, the idea is to protect our lands, protect our traditional land and protect our sacred land.”

The land of Amithsi is surrounded by a wall that has been built by the Amithians themselves, according to the owners of the area.

The encroachers also illegally dig up the land and destroy their traditional burial grounds.

The Amithian villagers also claim the encroached cattle are destroying their land.

“They are destroying our houses, destroying our gardens and destroying our traditional burial places,” said Gopinath, who was recently awarded the Padma Bhushan by the state government.

Gopinti, a farmer, said he has been protesting against cattle encroachers in the area for years.

“It is a law that we have to fight.

We want the government and the people to take swift action against cattle,” Gopini said.

“I am very concerned about the encroacher encroaching on my land.

It is very serious.

It has taken away my land, my water, my livelihood.”